Tag Archives: “Deanne Holden”

Deanne Holden’s “Body of Work” Collection

Body of Work

Deanne Holden’s creative process began when she read “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot, and “Stiff” by Mary Roach, which moved her to consider the body after death in a different light.

Her collection of sculptural jewellery, which incorporates structures based on abstracted surgical incisions as well as castings from bone and body parts,  is also influenced by Memento Mori (symbolic reminders of the inevitability of death), as well as how the dead continue to live on through contributions to medical science.

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The Degree Show Collection explores the idea that once you take away the notion of ‘self’ from the cadaver and the emotional associations of death, dead bodies have the potential to be beautiful.  As objects they fascinate, even more so when parts are removed from their original context. Out of context, they can be grotesque; their placement away from the body, disconcerting, unnerving, yet they can still leave the viewer enthralled.

By exploring themes of dissection and anatomy, this body of work is the beginning of a series reflecting on mortality and the notion of the purposefulness after death.

Each piece is individually handcrafted and made using photo-etched surgical steel, which is then Puk welded into shape.  The forms are based surgical and post-mortem incisions which are then re-shaped and abstracted.  These are then layered in latex, with inclusions and additional elements cast from bones and body parts,playing on the visual and tactile.

In time, the latex will degrade and rot, the colour and texture of the pieces will change, leaving eventually the metal frame or skeleton underneath, mimicking the transformation of the human body after death.

You can find out more about my work and links to my social media here.

 

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The Body Beautiful

 

Surgeons’ Hall Museum, has always been an intriguing place for me and is, in fact, one of my favourite places in Edinburgh.  Tucked away in the Royal College of Surgeons’ Campus in Edinburgh, if  you have an interest in anatomy, surgery and the curiosities of the human body, you could do far worse than spend an hour or two exploring it’s many treasures.

During my final year at DJCAD the Museum was, and remains, an incredibly inspiring resource.  Originally founded in 1505, with its collections expanding rapidly after 1699 when the cultural  interest in natural curiosities blossomed.  It was originally intended to be a medical teaching resource and is home to three individual museums: Pathology;  the History of Surgery  and the Dental Museum.

Yes, it’s weird.  Yes, it’s wonderful.  But it’s also rather beautiful. When you walk through the Pathology Museum, one of the largest collections of pathological anatomy in the UK, you are confronted with shelves lined with jars containing   preserved slices and sections of medical abnormalities, diseases of tissue and bone and preserved examples of the effects of weaponry on the body some some of which date back more than 100 years. Given that so much of my own work was focused on the removal of body parts from their original context, the research opportunities and context afforded by Surgeon’s Hall was invaluable.

If you venture upstairs to the History of Surgery, you will find  Edinburgh’s special contribution to surgical practice in modern times. This gallery traces the key dates in Scotland’s surgical advances and focuses on key figures such as Syme and pre-anaesthesia surgery, Simpson and the discovery of chloroform as an anaesthetic; and Lister and the breakthrough discovery of antiseptic.

The collection in the Dental Museum is also amazing,  exploring the development of dentistry from its earliest days to modern times. Despite initially looking like a small exhibit, it’s jam-packed with a huge range of tools and equipment.

Add to this the range of lectures, events and artist’s workshops and you have an amazing resource for artists and designers alike.

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Deanne Holden’s 2013 Degree Show at DJCAD

Body of Work

Deanne Holden’s creative process began when she read “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot, and “Stiff” by Mary Roach, which moved her to consider the body after death in a different light.

Her collection of sculptural jewellery, which incorporates structures based on abstracted surgical incisions as well as castings from bone and body parts,  is also influenced by Memento Mori (symbolic reminders of the inevitability of death), as well as how the dead continue to live on through contributions to medical science.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Degree Show Collection explores the idea that once you take away the notion of ‘self’ from the cadaver and the emotional associations of death, dead bodies have the potential to be beautiful.  As objects they fascinate, even more so when parts are removed from their original context. Out of context, they can be grotesque; their placement away from the body, disconcerting, unnerving, yet they can still leave the viewer enthralled.

By exploring themes of dissection and anatomy, this body of work is the beginning of a series reflecting on mortality and the notion of the purposefulness after death.

Click here to learn more about my work.

The DJCAD Degree Show will be held from 17-26th May 2013.

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My degree show space…

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It’s all coming together now folks…!

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Pieces for the upcoming DJCAD Degree Show!

Pieces for the upcoming DJCAD Degree Show!

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May 2, 2013 · 12:46 pm

DJCAD Degree Show 2013

Another example of my work on display at the DJCAD Degree Show 2013.

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A sneak peek at the degree show…

Body of Work

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April 26, 2013 · 3:54 pm