Tag Archives: Dundee

Deanne Holden’s “Body of Work” Collection

Body of Work

Deanne Holden’s creative process began when she read “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot, and “Stiff” by Mary Roach, which moved her to consider the body after death in a different light.

Her collection of sculptural jewellery, which incorporates structures based on abstracted surgical incisions as well as castings from bone and body parts,  is also influenced by Memento Mori (symbolic reminders of the inevitability of death), as well as how the dead continue to live on through contributions to medical science.

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The Degree Show Collection explores the idea that once you take away the notion of ‘self’ from the cadaver and the emotional associations of death, dead bodies have the potential to be beautiful.  As objects they fascinate, even more so when parts are removed from their original context. Out of context, they can be grotesque; their placement away from the body, disconcerting, unnerving, yet they can still leave the viewer enthralled.

By exploring themes of dissection and anatomy, this body of work is the beginning of a series reflecting on mortality and the notion of the purposefulness after death.

Each piece is individually handcrafted and made using photo-etched surgical steel, which is then Puk welded into shape.  The forms are based surgical and post-mortem incisions which are then re-shaped and abstracted.  These are then layered in latex, with inclusions and additional elements cast from bones and body parts,playing on the visual and tactile.

In time, the latex will degrade and rot, the colour and texture of the pieces will change, leaving eventually the metal frame or skeleton underneath, mimicking the transformation of the human body after death.

You can find out more about my work and links to my social media here.

 

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Deanne Holden’s 2013 Degree Show at DJCAD

Body of Work

Deanne Holden’s creative process began when she read “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot, and “Stiff” by Mary Roach, which moved her to consider the body after death in a different light.

Her collection of sculptural jewellery, which incorporates structures based on abstracted surgical incisions as well as castings from bone and body parts,  is also influenced by Memento Mori (symbolic reminders of the inevitability of death), as well as how the dead continue to live on through contributions to medical science.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Degree Show Collection explores the idea that once you take away the notion of ‘self’ from the cadaver and the emotional associations of death, dead bodies have the potential to be beautiful.  As objects they fascinate, even more so when parts are removed from their original context. Out of context, they can be grotesque; their placement away from the body, disconcerting, unnerving, yet they can still leave the viewer enthralled.

By exploring themes of dissection and anatomy, this body of work is the beginning of a series reflecting on mortality and the notion of the purposefulness after death.

Click here to learn more about my work.

The DJCAD Degree Show will be held from 17-26th May 2013.

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Inside Out

I mentioned in a previous post that I had been fortunate enough to spend time at MSI (The Medical Sciences Institute)in Dundee whilst conducting research for my degree show.  You can find out more about MSI here.

Recognised as one of the foremost biomedical research institutes, MSI do a great deal of research with Electron Microscopy.  And they were kind enough to give me permission to use  and share some of their striking images, taken by Dr. Paul Appelton.

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HeLa cells in motion

I was fortunate enough to see some HeLa cells dividing in the laboratory of the College of Life Sciences, Dundee.  The footage here (as well as the subsequent videos below)is taken from Youtube, but you can see what an amazing process this is.  And that the cells themselves, despite their negative resonances, are actually rather beautiful under the microscope.

Is it unsettling that something so beautiful can cause so much harm?

 

 

 

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Hazel White and the art of interpretation

This morning I was through at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design (DJCAD), Dundee, attending a lecture by the jeweller Hazel White called Make Things Make Sense.  It’s another one of those lectures that struck a chord with me and I thought I’d share with you.

Hazel is a jeweller and designer whose research and practice investigates the secret life of  personal possessions. She collaborates with artists, healthcare professionals,  computer programmers, forensic scientists and other designers to explore how our engagement with personal objects can be translated into products and systems that have meaning in people’s lives.

Which prompts the question – how can a designer make a piece of jewellery have meaning?  I’m in my second year at DJCAD and this is something we’re encouraged to express in our work and illustrate in our sketchbooks (no pun intended…), but how can meaning be created in a piece by a designer that is then translated into the experience of the wearer?

I’ll leave you to ponder that one a while…

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